Malla Reddy Institute of Technology and Science (MRITS) has been established in the year 2005 under the dynamic leadership of Shri Ch. Malla Reddy garu . The institution is sponsored by Malla Reddy Educational Society. Shri Ch. Malla Reddy garu, our founder Chairman has been in the field of education industry for the last 25 years with an intention of spreading quality education among children at the school level. He established his first technical college in the year 2002 and over a span of 7 years he established more than 10 professional colleges. He won as Honorable Member of Parliament (MP) for Malkajgiri Constituency which is in the jurisdiction of Hyderabad, Telangana State in the year 2014.

        Our college has been approved by All India Council of Technical Education(AICTE), New Delhi, Accredited by NBA for B.Tech., Recognized by UGC, New Delhi under 2(f) & 12(b) for receiving financial grants, Certified by ISO 9001:2008 and Permanently affiliated to Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad.

        Malla Reddy Institute of Technology and Science (MRITS) is an institution comfortable with the unique model of the technical education where the discovery, dissemination and application of knowledge are synergistically balanced. It is a part of larger societal systems and dynamically fueled by the process of involvement – involvement in the needs of individuals; involvement in the nurturing of inquisitive minds; involvement in the transfer of ideas from the campus to the marketplace and beyond. The creation of new knowledge that will benefit future technological society is at the heart of our mission. In order to achieve a position of educational leadership, our institution fosters an atmosphere of intellectual excitement among faculty, staff and the greater student community.


Course
Objectives:
1. provides an introduction to the fundamentals of distributed computer systems,assuming the availability of facilities for data transmission,IPC mechanisms in distributed systems,Remote procedure calls.
2. Expose students to current technology used to build architectures
to enhance distributed computing infrastructures with various computing
principles.


Outcomes

  • Able to comprehend and design a new distributed system with the desired features.
  • Able to start literature survey leading to further research in any subarea.
  • Able to develop new distributed applications.
UNIT-I

Characterization of Distributed Systems: Introduction, Examples of  Distributed Systems, Resource Sharing and the Web, Challenges.

System Models: Introduction, Architectural Models, Fundamental Models.

UNIT-II

Time and Global States: Introduction, Clocks Events and Process States, Synchronizing Physical Clocks, Logical Time and Logical Clocks, Global States, Distributed Debugging.

Coordination and Agreement: Introduction, Distributed Mutual Exclusion, Elections, Multicast Communication, Consensus and Related Problems.

UNIT-III

InterProcess Communication: Introduction, The API for the Internet Protocols, External Data Representation and Marshalling, Client-Server Communication, Group Communication, Case Study: IPC in UNIX.

Distributed Objects and Remote Invocation: Introduction, Communication between Distributed Objects, Remote Procedure Call, Events and Notifications, Case Study: JAVA RMI.

UNIT-IV

Distributed File Systems: Introduction, File Service Architecture, Case Study 1: Sun Network File System, Case Study 2: The Andrew File System.

Name Services: Introduction, Name Services and the Domain Name System, Directory Services, Case Study of the Global Name Services.

Distributed Shared Memory: Introduction, Design and Implementation Issues, Sequential Consistency and IVY case study, Release Consistency, Munin Case Study, Other Consistency Models.

UNIT- V

Transactions and Concurrency Control: Introduction, Transactions, Nested Transactions, Locks, Optimistic Concurrency Control, Timestamp Ordering, Comparison of Methods for Concurrency Control.

Distributed Transactions:   Introduction, Flat and Nested Distributed Transactions, Atomic Commit Protocols, Concurrency Control in Distributed Transactions, Distributed Deadlocks, Transaction Recovery.



COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

S.NO

COURSE OBJECTIVE

1

·       To understand basic components of computers.

 

2

·       To understand the architecture of 8086 processor.

 

3

·       To understand the instruction sets, instruction formats and various addressing modes of 8086.

 

4

·       To understand the representation of data at the machine level and how computations are performed

 

at machine level.

 

5

·       To understand the memory organization and I/O organization.

 

6

·       To understand the parallelism both in terms of single and multiple processors.

 

 

 COURSE OUTCOMES

 

S.NO

COURSE OUTCOME

After completing this course the student will be able to:

1

·       Able to understand the basic components and the design of CPU, ALU and Control Unit.

 

2

·       Ability to understand memory hierarchy and its impact on computer cost/performance.

 

3

·       Ability to understand the advantage of instruction level parallelism and pipelining for high performance Processor design.

 

4

·       Ability to understand the instruction set, instruction formats and addressing modes of 8086.

 

5

·       Ability to write assembly language programs to solve problems.

 

COURSE SYLLABUS

CS401ES: COMPUTER ORGANIZATION

B.Tech. II Year II Sem.


 

L    T    P  C


 

4    0    0    4


 

Course Objectives:

 

·       To understand basic components of computers.

 

·       To understand the architecture of 8086 processor.

 

·       To understand the instruction sets, instruction formats and various addressing modes of 8086.

 

·       To understand the representation of data at the machine level and how computations are performed

 

at machine level.

 

·       To understand the memory organization and I/O organization.

 

·       To understand the parallelism both in terms of single and multiple processors.

 

Course Outcomes:

 

·       Able to understand the basic components and the design of CPU, ALU and Control Unit.

 

·       Ability to understand memory hierarchy and its impact on computer cost/performance.

 

·       Ability to understand the advantage of instruction level parallelism and pipelining for high performance Processor design.

 

·       Ability to understand the instruction set, instruction formats and addressing modes of 8086.

 

·       Ability to write assembly language programs to solve problems.

 

UNIT - I

 

Digital Computers: Introduction, Block diagram of Digital Computer, Definition of Computer Organization, Computer Design and Computer Architecture.

 

Basic Computer Organization and Design: Instruction codes, Computer Registers, Computer instructions, Timing and Control, Instruction cycle, Memory Reference Instructions, Input – Output and Interrupt, Complete Computer Description.

Micro Programmed Control: Control memory, Address sequencing, micro program example, design of control unit.

 

UNIT - II

 

Central Processing Unit: The 8086 Processor Architecture, Register organization, Physical memory organization, General Bus Operation, I/O Addressing Capability, Special Processor Activities, Minimum and Maximum mode system and timings.

 

8086 Instruction Set and Assembler Directives-Machine language instruction formats, Addressing modes, Instruction set of 8086, Assembler directives and operators.


UNIT - III

 

Assembly Language Programming with 8086- Machine level programs, Machine coding the programs, Programming with an assembler, Assembly Language example programs.

 

Stack structure of 8086, Interrupts and Interrupt service routines, Interrupt cycle of 8086, Interrupt programming, Passing parameters to procedures, Macros, Timings and Delays.

 

UNIT - IV

 

Computer Arithmetic: Introduction, Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication Algorithms, Division Algorithms, Floating - point Arithmetic operations.

Input-Output Organization: Peripheral Devices, Input-Output Interface, Asynchronous data transfer, Modes of Transfer, Priority Interrupt, Direct memory Access, Input –Output Processor (IOP),Intel 8089 IOP.

 

UNIT - V

 

Memory Organization: Memory Hierarchy, Main Memory, Auxiliary memory, Associate Memory, Cache Memory.

 

Pipeline and Vector Processing: Parallel Processing, Pipelining, Arithmetic Pipeline, Instruction Pipeline, RISC Pipeline, Vector Processing, Array Processors.

Multi Processors: Characteristics of Multiprocessors, Interconnection Structures, Inter processor arbitration, Inter processor communication, and synchronization.


Objectives:

  • To understanding of software process models such as waterfall and evolutionary models.
  • To understanding of software requirements and SRS document.
  • To understanding of different software architectural styles.
  • To understanding of software testing approaches such as unit testing and integration testing.
  • To understanding on quality control and how to ensure good quality software.

Outcomes:                                                                                                                      

  • Ability to identity the minimum requirements for the development of application.
  • Ability to develop, maintain, efficient, reliable and cost effective software solutions.
  • Ability to critically thinking and evaluate assumptions and arguments.

UNIT - I:

Introduction to Software Engineering: The evolving role of software, Changing Nature of Software, Software myths.

A Generic view of process: Software engineering- A layered technology, a process framework, The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), Process patterns, process assessment, personal and team process models.

Process models: The waterfall model, Incremental process models, Evolutionary process models, The Unified process.

UNIT - II:

Software Requirements: Functional and non-functional requirements, User requirements, System requirements, Interface specification, the software requirements document. 

Requirements engineering process: Feasibility studies, Requirements elicitation and analysis, Requirements validation, Requirements management. 

System models : Context Models, Behavioral models, Data models, Object models, structured methods.

UNIT - III:

Design Engineering: Design process and Design quality, Design concepts, the design model. 

Creating an architectural design: Software architecture, Data design, Architectural styles and patterns, Architectural Design.

Object-Oriented Design: Objects and object classes, An Object-Oriented design process, Design evolution. 

Performing User interface design: Golden rules, User interface analysis and design, interface analysis, interface design steps, Design evaluation. 

UNIT - IV:

Testing Strategies: A strategic approach to software testing, test strategies for conventional software, Black-Box and White-Box testing, Validation testing, System testing, the art of Debugging. 

Product metrics: Software Quality, Metrics for Analysis Model, Metrics for Design Model, Metrics for source code, Metrics for testing, Metrics for maintenance. 

Metrics for Process and Products : Software Measurement, Metrics for software quality. 

Risk management: Reactive vs. Proactive Risk strategies, software risks, Risk identification, Risk projection, Risk refinement, RMMM, RMMM Plan. 

UNIT - V:

Quality Management: Quality concepts, Software quality assurance, Software Reviews, Formal technical reviews, Statistical Software quality Assurance, Software reliability, The ISO 9000 quality standards. 

TEXT BOOKS : 

  1. Software Engineering A practitioner’s Approach, Roger S Pressman, 6th edition. McGrawHill International Edition. 
  2. Software Engineering, Ian Sommerville, 7th edition, Pearson education.

REFERENCE BOOKS : 

  1. Software Engineering, A Precise Approach, Pankaj Jalote, Wiley India, 2010.
  2. Software Engineering: A Primer, Waman S Jawadekar, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008
  3. Fundamentals of Software Engineering, Rajib Mall, PHI, 2005
  4. Software Engineering, Principles and Practices, Deepak Jain, Oxford University Press.
  5. Software Engineering1: Abstraction and modelling, Diner Bjorner, Springer International edition, 2006.
  6. Software Engineering2: Specification of systems and languages, Diner Bjorner, Springer International edition 2006.
  7. Software Engineering Foundations, Yingux Wang, Auerbach Publications, 2008.
  8. Software Engineering Principles and Practice, Hans Van Vliet, 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
  9. Software Engineering3: Domains, Requirements, and Software Design, D. Bjorner, Springer International Edition.
  10. Introduction to Software Engineering, R. J. Leach, CRC Press.